Mild Depression Symptoms and Treatment

Mild Depression Symptoms and Treatment

Mild Depression Symptoms and Treatment

There is a surprising trend developing in the healthcare industry. depression is expected to be the second-costliest healthcare problem in the world. Depression is already the most expensive health issue that employers face, paying more in medical costs and lost productivity due to employee depression than to obesity, high blood pressure, smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle combined. Amazingly, on average, a depression episode is more costly than a heart attack. For that reason, it’s critical to know about depression symptoms and treatments before the disease becomes severe.
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Mild depression: Symptoms
The first step to effective mild depression treatment is recognizing the early symptoms of depression. They vary widely with each individual, but can often include long periods of irritability, deep sadness, apathy or lethargy, lack of emotion, long-term lack of joy or happiness, feelings of anger, loss of sleep, reduced appetite for food and sex, and loss of interest in hobbies, relationships, and work. While we’ve all experienced those symptoms at one time or another, the difference between normal, temporary mood swings and depression is the duration of the symptoms. Down-times usually don’t last longer than a few days, but depression usually lasts for weeks and months.
If you recognize those symptoms in yourself or others, it’s important to start making changes to alleviate them. While it’s never appropriate to self-diagnose, it is appropriate to make a few simple adjustments that tend to improve outlook and mood. If these don’t address your symptoms adequately, you should seek medical help.

Mild depression: treatment
To begin addressing your depression symptoms, be sure to avoid alcohol. Depression is a condition caused by the physiological side effects of chronic or heavy alcohol use; even moderate alcohol use contributes to depression. Get plenty of rest, eat a healthy diet, exercise regularly, get out in the sun a few times each week, and above all, seek professional help if you feel you might harm yourself or others.

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